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    A Dirty Wknd in Warwick for the Wiggle Stratford Tempest Sportive

    A Dirty Wknd in Warwick for the Wiggle Stratford Tempest Sportive

    Warwick might not be the first place you think of when booking a wknd away, but this quaint midlands town combines the perfect mix of an historical Norman setting with a vibrant and cosmopolitan nightlife. The castle is worth a visit alone (more on that below) and the surrounding countryside makes for the perfect place for a sportive, and therefore the perfect place for a Dirty Wknd!

    The Wiggle Stratford Tempest on the 16th July is fast becoming the best sportive in the midlands; starting and finishing at Warwick race course in the centre of town, it’s the perfect sportive to combine into a wknd away with loved ones and/or friends. See below for details and to enter.

    Travelling To Warwick

    Trains leave London Marylebone every hour and take roughly an hour and twenty minutes. Bike spaces are available on most trains, but it’s best to phone thetrainline.com and book your bike and train reservation at the same time. If you book an open ticket, you will still need to book a bike space before arriving at the station.

    The drive from London takes just over two hours depending on traffic, and parking in Warwick is easy with most hotels having free parking.

    Dirty Tip: We recommend taking the train. The town is wonderfully compact so you can walk everywhere, and the sportive start line is walkable from the city centre.

    Accommodation @ The Tudor House Inn

    The Tudor House Inn Warwick

    The Tudor House Inn offers comfortable and affordable rooms in an authentic Tudor houseDirectly opposite Warwick Castle, this quaint tudor house come hotel conversion is the perfect base from which to explore the town. The hotel has free parking for guests, or is only a 10 minute walk from the train station. Breakfast is included, and the hotel has free wifi throughout, so you can upload your strava data as soon as the sportive is over!

    Dirty Tip: Multiple room formats are available, so if your in a group, a pair or just on your own, you’ll find what you need here. 

    Friday Night — Dinner @ Micatto

    Miccato Italian Restaurant Dirty wknd Warwick

    Micatto Cusina Aperta, meaning open kitchen, is Warwick’s best Italian restaurant, and the perfect place to take on a few last minute carbs before the sportive. Located in the picturesque market square; the decor and vibe have an industrial feel inspired by the Soho district of New York. There isn’t a cooler spot in Warwick to relax from the week, and prepare for the next days ride.

    The menu is expansive, with all ingredients either sourced locally or imported direct from Italy, and the chefs are all Italian. All the pasta is homemade on site that day and, thanks to the ‘open kitchen’, you can watch your meal being prepared in front of you whilst enjoying a glass of Italian red. A little extra iron in your blood will help on the ride!

    Dirty Tip: The restaurant often books up, so make sure to book ahead, and let them know you’ll be travelling in that night, so might need to book a later table.

    Saturday Morning — Wiggle Stratford Tempest Sportive

    Wiggle Stratford Tempest Sportive Dirty Wknd

    Warwickshire’s roads are some of the best for cycling!With 3 routes to chose from this sportive has something for everyone; whether you’re a hardened pro or a relative beginner, the Warwickshire countryside offers quiet Roman roads, sleepy towns and beautiful scenery. That’s not to say that this sportive won’t test you; with a couple of good climbs on all routes, you’ll definitely feel it in the legs! Start times are between 8am and 9:15am and as you’re staying right by the start line, you won’t even have to get up that early!

    As with all Wiggle UKCE events the organisation is second to none. All participants benefit from mechanical and medical support, full route marking and generous feed stops. All finishers also receive a t-shirt, a medal and power bar goody bag. As the sportive finishes in the centre of Warwick, you’re only a short walk away from your hotel and the delights of exploring the town for the rest of the wknd!

    Dirty Tip: The elevation of all 3 routes is considerably less than many other sportives, so if you’re looking for a ride to increase your mileage on, this is it. At 101 miles, the epic route is the perfect opportunity for anyone thinking about riding a century with as few hills as possible. So go for it!

    Saturday Afternoon — Visit the Mill Garden

     The Mill Garden Warwick

    Obviously your first port of call will be refuelling, being the athlete that you are! After an exerting all that effort on the ride, you really need something like a burger to reward yourself for all the hard work! The Warwick Arms Hotel has a massive burger menu, and is located in the centre of town. You can’t go wrong!

    Once you’ve refuelled and deconstructed the sportive with your companions, we recommend heading to Mill Street, in the shadow of the castle and straddling the River Avon, and the famous Mill Garden; a beautiful place to while away a few hours. Sit an soak in the sun, and rest your tired legs!

    Dirty Tip: The Market Place is also a beautiful part of the town, and has a couple of great bars where you can get a drink, sit outside and watch the world go by. Head here after the gardens, you deserve it after the sportive.

    Saturday Evening — Dinner @ Tailors

    Tailors Restaurant Warwick 

    Tailor’s, also in the Market Place, is one of Warwick’s more upmarket restaurants, and the quality of the food is what brings people back again and again. Owned and run by two young local chefs, the menu is innovative and changes regularly. Service is of the highest quality, with everyone from the owners down to the wait staff helping to ensure that a friendly, local atmosphere is maintained. Saturday’s fill up quickly, so make sure to book in advance.

    Dirty Tip: After dinner head around the corner to The Globe for a cocktail to round off an epic day!

    Sunday Morning — Visit Warwick Castle

     Visit Warwick Castle Dirty Wknd Blog

    Dominating the town is Warwick Castle. Originally built in 1068, the castle in it’s current form was completed between the 12th and 14th centuries, and turned into a family home in 1608 by the Greville family, who lived there until the 70’s. Now the castle is open 7 days a week, and is one of the finest examples of it’s kind in the country. As well as the castle and grounds, visitors can view the beautifully restored interiors and watch daily medieval reenactments. Tickets start from £18 for the day, and discounts are available if you book online.

    Dirty Tip: Real history buffs, or anyone feeling particularly decadent, can actually stay in the castle! Starting at £550 per night, suites are available in the Tower. If you ever wanted to live like a Norman conquerer…

    Sunday Lunch @ The Rose & Crown

     Roast at the Rose and Crown Warwick

    The Rose and Crown is a Warwick institution having served locals and visitors alike in it’s current guise for over 10 years. Regularly named one of the UK’s top 10 pubs,  there’s nowhere else to go for a roast on a Sunday. This 17th century coaching inn treats it’s food like it’s decor; a wonderful mix of classic and contemporary styles. The Sunday roast is plentiful and very reasonable, with a choice of meats and a vegetarian option. There is a wide selection of local beers behind the bar, and the wine list is extensive. As we said before, we recommend getting the train, so you can enjoy a relaxing Sunday with a drink or two!

    Dirty Tip: After Lunch, walk off all that meat in nearby St Nicholas’ Park. You can hire boats and row down the River Avon in the shadow of the castle.

    Dirty Wknd In Warwick

    Cycling in Tokyo - A Tale of Two Rides

    Cycling in Tokyo - A Tale of Two Rides

    Cycling in a new and interesting country is a special kind of riding. The possibility of experiencing something completely new really fuels the desire to get out on the road. With adventure travel and active weekends growing in popularity, getting a ride in whilst you’re away is becoming easier, and the chance to ride in an exotic and unfamiliar location should never be missed!

    How you go about researching, planning and executing that ride, however, is just as important as where you go. If you’re on holiday and are planning just one or two days riding, then it’s even more important to get it right. Recently I travelled to Japan for a two week tour of the country, and never has the importance of good planning been more apparent.

    Cycling in Tokyo Blog Post

    Three days in Tokyo marked the end of the trip; the grand finale and the last chance to do some proper road cycling in this wonderful country. I had two full days set aside for riding so had meticulously planned my rides, and they could not of been more different! It wasn’t until half way through the second ride that I realised what the difference was, and why that ride, against the odds, was more enjoyable than the first.

    Ride No. 1 — Cycling alone in the Tokyo Mountains

    Not having Japanese maps on my Garmin meant that I was navigating old school — paper map in my pocket and town names written on my hand. As long as I followed the road signs (Tokyo is fantastically sign posted) then I would be fine. Granted, I did get lost a few times, but that was part of the fun! There was no reason to get back at a certain time or worry about getting lost; just a whole day to ride up into the mountains and around Miyagase Lake.

    Navigating Whilst Cycling in Tokyo

    Tokyo is a sprawling metropolis around 3 times the size of London, so whilst getting out to the mountains takes a fair bit of time, it really is worth it. The mountain roads leading up to the lake are smooth and challenging with plenty of decent climbs. Miyagase Lake is the perfect cycling location — the roads wind around the lake, crossing the water over two bridges before disappearing through a series of short tunnels under the mountains, finally emerging into daylight with an incredible view of the Miyagase Dam. The descent back down the mountain was breathtaking, before meandering through the Tokyo suburbs into the city. Sounds perfect, right?

    Lake Miyagase Dam Tokyo

    140km, 2,500 metres climbed and 9 hours of exploring some of the most incredible cycling I’ve experienced was an unforgettable day, but something was missing. The amazing roads, the massive climbs and the incredible views were great, but I had no one to share them with. Sitting at the top of the lake, marvelling at the view, I felt a bit sad without a friend to experience it with (and posting on Instagram doesn’t count!)

    Cycling alone can be a great break; a few hours of alone time to unplug and destress is incredibly valuable. However it really struck me during the ride just how important it is to have some mates to ride with, especially when exploring a new area. No matter how perfect the route, you need someone else to share it with! That’s why I was so glad that I had arranged ride number two in advance.

    Ride No. 2 — Rapha CC Tokyo Saturday Ride

    Riding with Rapha Cycle Club Tokyo

    Getting up at 6:30am wasn’t ideal, but I’d been looking forward to this ride for weeks, and wasn’t going to miss being led around the city by some local experts. The cafe was full when I arrived, with 2 rides going out that morning. I had booked onto the longer ride, with 12 others, all local RCCTYO members, bar myself and one other tourist.

    Our ride leaders, Hiroki and Masataka, led us out of the city centre quickly and easily, a completely different and much better route than the one I had formulated for ride one. Where it had taken me around 2.5 hours the day before, they made sure we were out of the city and in the Tama Hills in no time; embarking on one of the craziest routes I’ve ever had the pleasure to cycle!

    Urban Cycling in Japan

    Even with a functioning Garmin, this route would’ve been very hard to follow! We twisted and turned through tiny winding streets; up short sharp climbs and down long winding descents. For the locals in the group this was normal; but the “oohs”, “ahhs” and “wows” continually being uttered by the tourists as we twisted, turned and climbed showed just how amazing this ride was! Complete faith in our ride leaders was easy as they corralled the group in Japanese and in English, attacking every climb and descent with massive smiles on their faces; infecting us with their enthusiasm.

     Country Roads on Tokyo cycling route

    Whilst Lake Miyagase may have been more spectacular area to cycle; the camaraderie and local route knowledge of ride two made it a much more enjoyable day. Learning Japanese cycling customs, chatting with the local cyclists and being shown their world was an invaluable experience.

    One of the most satisfying aspects of the day was learning that cycling has a language of it’s own! Once we’d identified the usual hand signals and protocols, we fell immediately to chatting about bikes, rides, parts etc. My Japanese stretches to about 3 words, so the fact that these guys had a good grasp of English really helped. Whenever language did fail us, pointing at a cool component and giving a thumbs up always works!

    Cherry Blossom in Japan in Springtime

    So my advice is this — if you’re going on holiday or for a weekend away, and you intend to do some riding, find a group to ride with! The RCC is a great place to start if there is one in the area. You don’t have to join the club, but if you do then hiring a bike from them is really easy if you don’t want to travel with your own. In some countries (like Japan for instance) hiring a good road bike is not always easy, so joining the RCC eliminates that hassle.

    If you’re not into Rapha, or there isn’t a club where you are going, then get on google and find a local ride group. There are usually plenty, and if you drop them an email in advance, they’re normally thrilled to have you along. Exploring a new area is always best in a group, and everyone knows that local knowledge trumps Strava every time. So join a ride group, and let the experts show you around their home town!

     Dirty Wknd Active Travel Guide

     

    My Thoughts On Having My Bicycle Stolen

    Bicycle Blog Post Bike Theft

    I’ve just had my bike stolen. In a time when most major cities are on high terror alert and human lives are being lost daily all over the world, I know that this by comparison is not a great tragedy, but I'm very upset about it. It is not necessarily the monetary loss, or even the hassle it brings, but more the feeling that I've lost a friend. It sounds silly I know, but we've been through a lot, my trusty Ribble and I.

    A few things went through my mind when I discovered that the bike was gone. Firstly, I assumed that I must be mistaken; I must have chained the bike to a different set of railings, or not actually arrived by bike at all. Either way, there must have been some mistake. Then the rage comes! “Some bastard has stolen my bike, if I ever catch them…” I stood on the High Street, near to where the bike was locked, scanning the horizon, expecting to see someone casually cruising around on my beloved bike. What I would’ve done had I seen the culprit I’m not sure; given chase? Made a citizen’s arrest? Of course I never found out, as the bike and the culprit were long gone. After the anger subsided, I was left feeling empty and sad, as if a part of me was missing. It would be quite extreme to compare it to losing a limb; I'm sure I would be much distraught had I lost a leg, but a sense of great loss was keenly felt. Like the realisation that the family pet is going to be put down; you know things won't be quite the same for a while. 

    Such is the bond (obsession?) between cyclists and their bikes; we favour our bicycles over many other material possessions. Ask a cyclist what they would save first from a fire (after family of course) and 90% would say their bike. It’s an unusual bond; a piece of steel/aluminium/carbon that weighs nothing, takes up a lot of space and, to the dismay of our partners and families, most of our waking thoughts! It is true that most modern bikes are expensive pieces of kit, and for most not easy to replace; however for me the emotional loss far outweighs the financial one.

    Blog Post Cycling in Scotland Isle of Skye

    It is the memories of rides attempted, journeys made and challenges completed that really tug on the heartstrings! As I walked home, far too sad for public transport, I reflected on the above; London to Paris, London to Nice, Ride London, countless triathlons and sportives Tours of the Lake and Peak Districts and one epic week long ride around Scotland. One man and his bicycle. The two of us versus whatever the day could throw at us; wind, rain (sideways in Scotland), scorching temperatures and lung-burning climbs. The memories of the pain and the exhaustion come flooding back and brought a massive smile to my face! The last 30 miles of a 112 mile ride from Inverness to Portree on the Isle of Skye being the strongest memory. It had rained all morning, from Loch Ness to the Skye road; 3 hours of driving rain, the entire Loch shrouded in mist! The Skye road from Invermoriston to the Kyle of Lochalsh was one of the most incredible 3 hours of cycling in my life. Flying down beautifully quiet roads, Munros and mountains on either side, rounding corners to find giant Lochs reflecting their surroundings in the their smooth blue waters. It really was a glorious cycle.

    Stronger in my memory however is the next 30 odd miles. After a quick coffee and a panini we rode over the bridge onto Skye, and straight into a world of pain! The road snaked up and down (but mostly up) as we followed the contours of the island over the Cuilins (a rather large mountain range) and into Portree. The exhaustion we felt was only matched by the relief of sweet rest, and the gratitude and love I felt for my bicycle! Like a willing servant it obeyed every command without protest; no creaks from the bearings, no squeak of the chain. The biggest climbs and the resulting descents were taken on with relish, spurring me on and galvanising my resolve to go faster, higher, longer. The bike became a part of me on these long rides and challenges. If the bike fails, then so do I. It never did.

    Blog Post Bike Theft Cycling Scotland Inverness

     


    I’ve never had a house broken into, but people who have often say the worst thing about burglary is having their personal space invaded, their inner sanctum disrupted. They live on a knife edge, every noise a possible intruder. Life goes on after having my bike stolen; I will buy another bike, and I will continue to ride as much as I physically can, however I’ll always feel a twinge of sadness for my poor old Ribble. Taken before it’s time!

    My advice to any cyclists out there is to make sure your bike is insured, and make sure you are very specific with the insurance company or bank about how much you are insuring it for, not just how much it is worth. Also it is absolutely imperative that you note down the frame number, and get it tagged by the police. It was something I always meant to do, but never got around to. If I had, the chances of recovering my bike would’ve doubled. I won’t make that mistake again!

    To get your bike registered click here - Bike Registration

    Top 5 things to do in Bath this Christmas

    Top 5 things to do in Bath this Christmas

    Bath is the perfect city to see in a weekend; intimate, but packed full of amazing history and nightlife. The incredible North Somerset countryside also offers excellent cycling and walking routes. At only two hours from London, it’s the perfect spot for a Dirty Weekend!

    There is also something magical about the Ancient Roman city during the festive period that makes now the best time to go. From the Christmas market surrounding the Abbey, to the quaintly decorated Georgian streets; Bath at this time of year will have you feeling all warm and fuzzy inside.

    1. Visit Bath Christmas market

    Bath Christmas Market is the largest in southern England with over 170 wooden ‘chalet’ stalls selling all kinds of craft gifts, over 80% of which are hand made by local traders. An afternoon in the market is an afternoon well spent; with the smell of mulled wine, fresh mince pies, and the sounds of carol singers to accompany you. And if you do need a little break from shopping, pop into the Apres Ski bar (new this year), and just drink in the atmosphere. The stalls surround the Abbey and the Spa in the centre of the city, so there aren’t many more spectacular locations for a Christmas Market. More info — http://www.bathchristmasmarket.co.uk/

    2. Cycle to Cheddar Gorge

    The incredible Cheddar Gogre cycle — not as daunting as it looks!

    Cheddar Gorge is one of the South West’s most beautiful sights, and is something of a pilgrimage for cyclists. Nestled in the Mendip Hills (itself an outstanding area of natural beauty), it is Britain’s biggest gorge, boasting cliffs of 450 feet. The road that runs through the gorge is an incredible cycle; it’s hilly and challenging, but the beautiful landscape will keep you going. We recommend storing your bikes at the visitors centre and taking a walk around — there’s loads to see and do, and a nice little cafe for a spot of lunch before the ride back. It’s a 25 mile cycle south west from Bath, so doable on an active weekend away; the outstanding landscape is well worth the effort! More info — http://www.cheddargorge.co.uk/

    3. Hike the Bath Skyline walk

    Bath is a great city to hike around, with incredible hills, history and scenery right on your doorstep. It’s compact size means that as soon as you get out of the centre, you’re basically in the countryside! The Skyline walk starts just south of the city on Bathwick Hill and heads out in a 6 mile loop over stile and through meadow, offering some stunning views of the city along the way. The route takes in an iron age fort and an 18th Century castle, with plenty of wildlife along the way. It is a challenging walk, with some steep hills, but it’s definitely worth it for the views. The route ends where it began, so you can wander back into the city for a well deserved drink. More info — Bath Skyline Walk

    4. Climb at Cheddar Gorge

    We really can’t recommend Cheddar Gorge highly enough! It offers so much to the active weekender, and is so close to Bath, you really can get the best of both a relaxing city break and an extreme weekend! If you’re not a cyclist, then Cheddar Gorge is a short drive from Bath with free parking at the visitors centre. Once there, you can hike the limestone cliff path, complete with incredible views of Somerset, or book yourself onto a rock climbing excursion. There are different level classes, so complete beginners can be shown the ropes, and more experienced climbers can tackle some of the gorge’s tougher climbs . If you’re planning a Christmas trip to Bath, then aim for the 4th December: Cheddar Gorge’s festive night! Carol singers and festive food and wine; all set in the beautiful surrounds of the gorge. More info — http://www.cheddargorge.co.uk/

    5. Visit the Spa’s, old and new

    Thermae Spa rooftop pool, complete with Abbey view!

    No trip to Bath is complete without visiting the Roman and Thermae spas. One ancient; one ultra-modern, and both incredible experiences. Pick up aSpas Ancient and Modern pass and get entry into both spas, with lunch or champagne tea in the Pump Room. The Roman Baths are one of the most famous historical sites in Northern Europe, and the free audio guides make the tour incredibly interactive. You can even listen to commentary from Bill Bryson, the American best-seller, who lived in bath for a while. From the ancient history of Roman Britain, you move seamlessly onto the very 21st Century modern Thermae Spa. It is the country’s only naturally warm spa, and a great way to spend a relaxing afternoon, especially if you’ve cycled or hiked the day before. They have taken the ancient spa waters, the very same that the Romans bathed in nearly 2000 years ago, and housed it in a high-tech setting complete with modern architecture. So come to Bath, and do like the Romans do — spend an afternoon in the Minerva Bath, indulging in one of the spa treatments, or just relaxing in the roof top pool. When in Rome… http://www.romanbaths.co.uk/

    The Top 5 ‘New’ Cycling Cafes in the UK

    The well documented rise of cycling has lead to many positives; the expansion of the UK cycling network, an active online community, and a national team we can finally be proud of. Another very welcome institution on the rise is the ‘cycling cafe’.

    For many years cycling cafes were the dwelling of hirsute East Londoners, trading couriering war stories and swapping rare Japanese fixie parts. However, as the sport of cycling has become more mainstream, thanks largely to Tour de France victories and the media coverage that affords, a new crop of cycling cafes have emerged. This new breed are doing their bit to grow the sport by turning on new cyclists with advice, camaraderie and excellent coffee!

    1. The Velo House, Tunbridge Wells — http://www.thevelohouse.com/

    Opening in 2014, The Velo House quickly became the focal point of the burgeoning North Kent cycle scene. Ollie and the team are cyclists first and foremost, and they have kept that in mind with their refuel, reduce and reward mantra. They serve Coffee Officina, Tea Pigs and a wide variety of beers and wine, alongside a delicious, healthy menu. Upstairs the shop sells an eclectic mix of cool gear, and the workshop team in the back can fix, shine and tune your bike whilst you wait. Weekly club rides and regular events are also on offer to feed your cycling habit.

    2. Rapha Cafe, Manchester — http://pages.rapha.cc/clubs/manchester

    The name Rapha is now synonymous with high end, high quality cycling kit, so it’s no wonder that their first cafe offering in 2012, in central London, was a huge success. So much so that the brand have opened another ‘cycle club’ in Manchester, and it’s doing just as well. Many have written off the cafes as a ‘gallery’ to show off Rapha products, but it’s hard to argue with the style and atmosphere they’ve created. Alongside events, exhibitions and film screenings, there are also organised weekend club rides out to Cheshire and the Peak District. If you’re lucky, you might even bump into a Team Sky rider or two!

    3. Dandy Horse, Norwich — http://www.dandy-horse.co.uk/

    Norwich may be (in)famous for Alan Partridge and Delia Smith, but it has an exciting and emerging cycling culture to rival anywhere, and an excellent cycling cafe in Dandy Horse. They sell excellent coffee which changes daily, alongside fresh cakes and sandwiches. The workshop is staffed with over 10 years of mechanical and wheel building experience, so your beloved steed will be in good hands. What Dandy Horse pride themselves on, however, is their custom builds and restorations. Take in your frame (or pick one of theirs) and have them build your dream bike. Grab a coffee and drool over the beautiful selection; you won’t be disappointed.

    4. Pedalling Squares, Newcastle Upon Tyne -http://www.pedallingsquarescafe.com/

    Pedalling Squares is so much more than a cycling cafe! An event space, a retro jersey emporium and a ‘Supper Club’; there’s always something going on at The Old Brassworks. They brew locally sourced ground coffee and ‘feed stations’ offer ‘cycling legend’ themed panini’s (we had Greg Lemond). The Workshop is run by Vieri Velo, the nicest bike blokes in the North East! They’ll fix your bike, fit parts you’ve brought in for free, and even buy you a coffee (if you’re extra polite).

    5. Maison Du Velo, Reigate — http://www.maisonduvelo.cc/

    Maison Du Velo is the perfect pre or post ride stop if you’re out in either the Surrey Hills or the North Downs. This ultra-modern cafe and shop has a gallery feel to it, with the bikes and kit very much ‘on display’. They are passionate about the choice brands they stock (and the coffee they serve), and have complete confidence in their performance ability. The workshop team offer a range of services and comprehensive Bike Fit options to make sure that your setup is on point. Shop rides are weekly and vary by ability, so everyone can get involved.

    What Your Weekend Bag Says About You

    Your weekend bag says a lot about the type of person you are. Whether you’re jetting off to the latest European destination, or climbing in North Wales, the bag you carry is more important than you know.

    1. Sandqvist Waxed Canvas Weekend Bag

    Simple, well made, beautiful and classic. You’re not reinventing the wheel; you’re just making the wheel look good, go further and last longer. You like a cool brand with a cool story, and you like your things to last.. A weekend away with you will consist of the cool side of town, boutique coffee, craft beer and beards.

    2. North Face Base Camp Duffel Bag

    You’re built to last and you love getting your hands (and your bag) dirty. You’re an adventurer; equally comfortable in a boutique hotel or a tent, and ready for anything. You like to wear your luggage on your back, just in case you need to break into a spontaneous run/climb/commando roll. A weekend away with you will most likely consist of sleeping somewhere unusual, getting dirty, and loving it!

    3. Herschel Duffle Bag

    You’re weekend is about more than your bag. However, you’re not just going to carry around any old thing; You’ve found  a cool brand that makes great bags. the fact that it doesn’t cost the earth is a bonus. A weekend away with you consists of a warehouse rave and watching the sun come up.

    4. Longchamp Le Pliage Travel Bag

    Stylish and practical; you know your brands, but you aren’t trying to make a statement - you’ve got too much to organise to worry about that!  A weekend away with you will consist of style, grace and a precisely organised schedule.

    5. Classic Leather Mulberry Bag 

    You are making a statement! Everything you do is some sort of statement; only the finest will do. You know what you want, and you always get it. A weekend away with you will consist of fine dining, cocktail parties and some sort of yacht.